Tuesday , 15 December 2015
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Vitamin K Benefits

To understand Vitamin K benefits, you should know that there are three main forms of Vitamin K – K1, K2, and K3. The first two are from natural sources and the third, Vitamin K3, is a synthetic only version of Vitamin K and can be toxic if too much is taken. Vitamin K benefits are best received from organic sources such as Kale, Spinach, Broccoli, Brussels Sprouts, Collard Greens and other green veggies.
Vitamin K Benefits

Vitamin K2 is produced by the healthy “good” bacteria in your gut. It is also found in fermented foods such as Kefir, Sauerkraut, and Natto (fermented Soy commonly eaten in Japan).

I’ve seen little difference between Vitamins K1 and K2 other than where they come from, meaning that whether you get your Vitamin K from plants or fermented foods seems to make no difference, as long as you are getting enough Vitamin K in general.


Dosage:

All remedies listed below have the same dosage instructions. To fully experience the Vitamin K benefits, simply make sure that your supplementation is Vitamin K1 or K2 and not K3. Also look at the other ingredients to make sure you aren’t taking fillers and preservatives such as magnesium stearate and stearic acid.

There are differing opinions as to how much Vitamin K we need per day, so I’ve listed a few recommendations below:

The National Academy of Sciences and the USDA:

  • Males and females, 0-6 months: 2 micrograms
  • Males and females, 7-12 months: 2.5 micrograms
  • Males and females, 1-3 years: 30 micrograms
  • Males and females, 4-8 years: 55 micrograms
  • Males and females, 9-13 years: 60 micrograms
  • Males and females, 14-18 years: 75 micrograms
  • Males, 19 years and older: 120 micrograms
  • Females, 19 years and older: 90 micrograms
  • Pregnant or lactating females, 18 years and younger: 75 micrograms
  • Pregnant or lactating females, 19 years and older: 90 micrograms

Dr. Cees Vermeer (a Vitamin K expert):

  • 45 to 185 micrograms for adults.

Various studies that use Vitamin K in the prevention of Osteoporosis or Alzheimer’s:

  • 1000 micrograms up to 45 milligrams.

 

A note about Vitamin K toxicity: If you are given Vitamin K by a doctor, make sure that it is not Vitamin K3, the synthesized version of Vitamin K. This form has led to toxicity symptoms in adults and to a few deaths in infants as well. The natural forms of Vitamin K (K1 and K2) have no reports of toxicity or death of any kind.


Vitamin K Benefits and the Conditions it Treats:

 

Blood Clotting:

The most well known Vitamin K benefit is it’s function in regulating blood clotting activity. Without Vitamin K your blood would not clot, causing some serioius issues such as bleeding out from minor cuts and scrapes. If your blood has trouble clotting,ask your health practitioner to test for Vitamin K deficiency.

Heart Disease:

One of the Vitamin K benefits being studied is its role in preventing the hardening of arteries through calcification. Preventing this process keeps your arteries soft and pliable and Vitamin K is one of the components necessary for your body to be able to do this.

Osteoporosis:

Studies are ongoing, but so far there is promising evidence that Vitamin K will help you prevent Osteoporosis. Simply making sure that you are not deficient (as most people who eat a Westernized type diet are) will go a long way to keeping your bones strong.


General Properties:

Vitamin K is a fat soluble vitamin that is most commonly known as the blood clotting Vitamin. This is because we would bleed to death from a simple cut or scrape without the benefit of Vitamin K.

Many other studies are being done to see if Vitamin K benefits other conditions and ailments such as Alzheimer’s, Cancer and Osteoporosis. (You can subscribe to our RSS feed if you’d like to be updated when there is more information on this important Vitamin.)

There are three main forms of Vitamin K – K1, K2, and K3. The first two are from natural sources and the third, Vitamin K3, is a synthetic only version of Vitamin K and can be toxic if too much is taken. Vitamin K benefits are best received from organic sources such as Kale, Spinach, Broccoli, Brussels Sprouts, Collard Greens and other green veggies.

Vitamin K2 is produced by the healthy “good” bacteria in your gut. It is also found in fermented foods such as Kefir, Sauerkraut, and Natto (fermented Soy commonly eaten in Japan).

I’ve seen little difference between Vitamins K1 and K2 other than where they come from, meaning that whether you get your Vitamin K from plants or fermented foods seems to make no difference, as long as you are getting enough Vitamin K in general.


Possible Side Effects:

You can take as much natural Vitamin K (K1 and K2) as you like without any toxic side effects but watch out for synthetic Vitamin K (K3) as too much of that can cause serious problems and even death in infants.

If you are on a blood thinning regimen or medication, talk to your health practitioner before increasing your Vitamin K intake because it could cancel out the effects of the medicine.


Drug Interactions:

Blood Thinners (e.g. Warfarin, Coumadin, and Asprin): Talk to your health care practitioner before taking extra Vitamin K while taking these drugs. Vitamin K will render these drugs obsolete and should be avoided while on these medications.


Did You Know…?

  • Vitamin K got its name because when it was discovered in Germany in 1929, they called it koagulationsvitamin after the fact that it coagulated the blood of the animals they were experimenting on.
  • “Vitamin K” has also been used as a slang term for an anesthetic called Ketamine.
  • One way to become Vitamin K deficient is to take too many antibiotics while not taking probiotics. The good bacteria in your gut produce Vitamin K2 and antibiotics will kill them in addition to the bad bacteria.

Juliana Peel is an enthusiast blogger, author and social media addict. She is the founder of remedieshow.com. Her publications are well researched and they provide tips and tricks related to Beauty and Health issues.